Special Features

Jazz Studies Online aims to broaden thinking about jazz. We have selected a wide range of digital resources - journal articles, book chapters, magazines, teaching materials, talks, internet links, and performances - to represent the diversity and innovation in jazz studies. Some of the themes explored here are the impact of jazz on modern art, on cultural and social struggles, and on any field of human interaction that may involve improvisation.

  • This artful survey of interpretations of jazz history is also a challenge to the notion that there can or should be any single one. DeVeaux shows that common claims as to what jazz is about-a form of resistance, a folk art, an autonomous high art-coexist uneasily, and that each has been used to support otherwise antagonistic stylistic agendas. He calls for closer inquiry into the nuanced history of each period and rejects dogmatic assertions of jazz' "essence."

  • In this special issue (Nos. 71-72, Spring 2001-Spring 2002), Current Musicology drew together some of the most prominent scholars in the nascent field of jazz studies to deal with important and provocative questions the subject has raised. The volume was dedicated to Columbia professor Mark Tucker, whose untimely death on December 6, 2000 robbed the field of one of its leading lights. This JSO special feature presents selected articles from the issue. © Used by permission of Current Musicology and the authors of specific excerpts.